Palestinians are holding a general strike tomorrow, and calling on us to join them

Palestinians are holding a general strike tomorrow – Tuesday 18 May – across historic Palestine. The general strike is against the ongoing Israeli attacks on the Palestinian people. Who Profits?, an independent information centre tweeted about the potential power of the strike: The Palestinian people have declared a general strike tomorrow in all of historic Palestine. We at Who Profits are in complete support of the strike! This is some info the strength of the strike. See thread for more. pic.twitter.com/8GK92fhafC — Who Profits (@Who_Profits) May 17, 2021 Massacre The Israeli military is currently bombing the Gaza Strip. On 16 May the Palestinian Center for Human Rights reported…

0 Comments

Israeli historian Ilan Pappé accuses Netanyahu of ‘calculated and cynical provocation’ in Gaza attacks

15 May was al-Nakba Day, an annual commemoration of the ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians in the late 1940s. On that symbolic day, The Canary spoke to historian Ilan Pappé in an exclusive interview. Professor Pappé is himself an Israeli Jew whose parents settled in Israel after fleeing persecution in Nazi-occupied Europe. However, he’s a staunch critic of both the events that led to Israel’s founding in 1948 and Israeli policy towards Palestinians since then. Pappé shared his expertise about what happened during al-Nakba, how it has been distorted by Israeli propaganda, and how this ethnic cleansing has a lasting relevance to this very day. He also discussed…

0 Comments

Britain’s lies and ‘disinformation’, won’t stop its bloody past haunting it

On 11 May a coroner said the British army shot dead nine innocent civilians in Ballymurphy, Belfast between 9 and 11 August 1971. The massacre is far from an isolated incident, but Britain’s bloody record in Ireland is too long to explore in one article. That record is a mix of British establishment collusion with loyalist terrorists, and killings carried out by the British army and police. The ink could hardly have been dry on the coroner’s report when the anniversary of the death of two more innocent civilians resurfaced. And their deaths, at the dawn of the 30-year conflict in Ireland, remind us who the real ‘terrorists’…

0 Comments

Met Officers investigated for inappropriately accessing Sarah Everard case files

Met Police bosses are checking whether all the officers and staff who accessed files relating to Sarah Everard’s death did so legitimately. The force’s internal Directorate of Professional Standards is contacting all employees who looked at the records to check why they viewed the files. The force would not say how many officers and staff were being contacted or why the action was being taken, but one officer linked to the investigation is already being examined by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) after sharing a highly offensive graphic with colleagues. Highly offensive The probationary constable in question was a cordon officer in Kent during searches. They have…

0 Comments

Court clears way for Samoa to get its first woman leader

Samoa appears set to appoint its first woman leader after the nation’s top court reinstated the results of a knife-edge election last month. Two decisions by the supreme court have paved the way for Fiame Naomi Mata’afa to become prime minister of the small island nation. Her ascent represents a significant milestone not only for Samoa but for the broader South Pacific region, where there have been few women leaders. Like many of its neighbours, Samoa tends to be conservative, strongly Christian and deeply traditional. An advocate for women’s equality, Fiame, who was born in 1957, broke new ground during her campaign by going on the road and…

0 Comments

Charity warns of ‘shocking’ failures in care for people with dementia

The number of people with dementia admitted to hospital when it could be avoided is set to spiral, a charity has warned. Figures from the Alzheimer’s Society, based on a snapshot of 45 NHS trusts in the UK, found that, even before the pandemic, avoidable hospital admissions were rising and it expects this could get worse due to inadequate social care. The charity said that, in the last month alone, it has heard “shocking” reports of people with dementia losing the ability to walk, getting pneumonia, and being rushed to hospital with avoidable kidney damage from dehydration. Data from 45 trusts under the Freedom of Information Act found…

0 Comments

Lowkey tells The Canary Israel’s massacring in Gaza is the ‘snarls’ of a ‘brutal regime’

The huge demo in London for Palestine on Saturday 15 May was the “rebirth” of the solidarity movement. The Canary was there to witness it. And we caught up with musician and activist Lowkey. He told us that the actions of the state of Israel in Gaza are the “snarls of a brutal regime” presiding over a “horrific siege” of the occupied territories. But the demo was marred by predictable police violence. Ongoing slaughter in Gaza As of 4:30pm on Sunday 16 May, Israeli forces have killed at least 188 Palestinians in Gaza in the past week. 55 of these were children. They’ve injured around 1,230 people. In…

0 Comments

Spycop’s testimony and other evidence expose the dark underbelly of UK political policing

Earlier this month undercover police officer (UCO) HN304 provided testimony to the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI). It revealed attitudes and behaviour of UCOs that appear to support what can only be described as institutionalised rape. However, aspects of that testimony also included some basic errors, suggesting flawed intelligence-gathering. Extrapolating, that might explain why over decades UCO operations tended to rely on cover-ups of police crimes, frame-ups of protesters that led to miscarriages of justice, and facilitating blacklisting. Unravelling claims A number of spurious claims were made by undercover officer HN304 (‘Graham Coates‘) to the UCPI. For example, he stated that Anarchy magazine was linked to the Angry Brigade…

0 Comments

Matt Hancock just weaselled his way through Sunday TV

Health secretary Matt Hancock did the morning TV rounds on Sunday 16 May. And like the good Tory minister he is, he weaselled his way through most of it. Hancock’s Half Hour First up, and Hancock was on Sophy Ridge on Sunday. People are becoming worried about the so-called ‘Indian variant’ of coronavirus (Covid-19). SAGE has warned the variant may be 50% more transmissible than the Kent strain. But the government is still planning on easing lockdown restrictions further on Monday 17 May. So, Ridge put this to Hancock. His response was effectively to shrug his shoulders. Hancock said of the situation: The thing is, though, Sophy, and…

0 Comments

Israel’s deadliest single attack kills dozens of people in Gaza

Israeli air strikes in the heart of Gaza City have flattened three buildings and killed at least 26 people. This makes it the deadliest single attack since Israel began attacks on Gaza nearly a week ago. The Gaza health ministry said 10 women and eight children were among those killed in Sunday’s attack, with another 50 people injured. Rescuers raced to pull survivors and bodies from the rubble following the assault. Israel bombing before peace talks Earlier, Israel claims it had bombed the home of Gaza’s top Hamas leader in a separate strike. It was the third such air attack targeting the homes of Hamas leaders in the…

0 Comments