Betrayal at Attica: NY Violently Crushed Attica Prison Uprising Amid Negotiations, Then Covered It Up

On the 50th anniversary of the Attica prison uprising, we look at the cover-up that began immediately after New York state police stormed the prison and opened fire, killing 29 inmates and 10 hostages. David Rothenberg, a member of the Attica Observers Committee brought into Attica to help negotiate a peaceful resolution, says the prison was “an institution that only knew how to run by punishment,” laying the groundwork for the uprising. “The event itself is almost a microscopic view of the failure of our criminal justice system and our prison system,” says Rothenberg. We also speak with filmmaker Michael Hull, director of the new HBO Max documentary…

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Met accused of ‘betrayal of public’ over 1987 unsolved murder

Support us and go ad-freeBritain’s biggest police force has been accused of a “betrayal of the public” and continuing to “lack candour” in its statements over the unsolved murder of private investigator Daniel Morgan. Betrayal The Metropolitan Police were accused of institutional corruption by an independent panel over the 1987 killing, which has remained unsolved despite at least four police investigations and an inquest. Father-of-two Morgan was murdered with an axe in the car park of the Golden Lion pub in Sydenham, South-East London, in March that year, and his killer has never been brought to justice. On 14 July, chairwoman of the panel Baroness Nuala O’Loan told…

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U.S. Recognizes Morocco's Occupation of Western Sahara in Latest Betrayal of Sahrawi People

We continue to examine the U.S.-brokered deal between Morocco and Israel to normalize relations. As part of the deal, the U.S. will become the first country in the world to recognize Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara, which Morocco has occupied since 1975 in defiance of the international community. We convene a roundtable to discuss developments: Mouloud Said, a representative of the Polisario Front in Washington; Stephen Zunes, professor of politics and international studies at the University of San Francisco; and Sahrawi journalist and activist Nazha El-Khalidi. Source link

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The Tory War Crimes Immunity Bill is betrayal of the troops by their officers

The Overseas Operations Bill may or may not pass its third reading on 3 November. But for a diverse range of thinktanks, military charities, human rights organisations, legal experts, and former military personnel the verdict is already in: this legislation isn’t fit for the statute books. The recently published report by a parliamentary committee is just the latest tearing apart of the bill. But there is more to this issue than legal details or turns of phrase to be haggled over here and there. This bill is a gross betrayal of British troops and veterans, an attack on the rule of law and human rights, and it will…

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