Four years later and Grenfell Tower survivors are still being ‘denied justice’

A survivor of the Grenfell Tower tragedy has said ex-residents are still being “denied swift justice” four years on from the catastrophic fire. Tiago Alves, his father, mother and younger sister all escaped from their home in Flat 105 on the 13th floor in the early stages of the deadly blaze on June 14, 2017. On the night of the fire, his parents, returning home after dropping off visiting family at their hotel, became aware of smoke on the fourth floor. “It could have been me” Alves’s father woke his sleeping children and alerted other residents on their floor to get out of the building that would eventually…

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Previously unknown fifth death revealed 20 years on from the Deepcut army scandal

Nearly 20 years ago, a scandal rocked the British military and attracted major press attention. It emerged that between 1995 and 2002, four young army recruits died of gunshot wounds at the Surrey training base known as Deepcut Barracks. Now, a fifth death during the same period has been reported. Sean Benton, 20, and Cheryl James, 18, died while on guard duty at the camp in June and November 1995. Geoff Gray, 17, died in September 2001, and also while carrying out sentry duties. James Collinson, 17, was also on guard when he died of gunshot wounds in March 2002. Their deaths would send shockwaves through the army…

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Facebook Bans Trump for 2 Years, But Its Design Still Marginalizes Key Voices in Public Discourse

Social media giant Facebook has announced it has suspended former President Donald Trump’s account until at least 2023. He was initially suspended from the platform for comments to supporters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on January 6 and is permanently banned on Twitter. Facebook’s move could have implications for other world leaders who use Facebook, like Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Jameel Jaffer, director of the Knight First Amendment Institute, said he is not sure the decision struck the right balance for protecting free speech but is defensible because Facebook “has a responsibility to ensure that the people using its platform aren’t using…

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As Biden Marks 100 Years Since Tulsa Massacre, Calls Grow for Reparations to Close Racial Wealth Gap

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.AMY GOODMAN: President Biden traveled to Tulsa, Oklahoma, Tuesday to mark the hundredth anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre, one of the single greatest acts of racist terror in U.S. history. Over a span of 18 hours, a white mob burned down what was known as “Black Wall Street,” the thriving African American neighborhood of Greenwood in Tulsa. An estimated 300 African Americans were killed. On Tuesday, Biden became the first U.S. president to visit the scene of the massacre, where he paid honor to the victims and the few remaining survivors. Biden recounted the…

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Fifty years on, the DUP finally tries democracy. It’s not going well.

On 28 May, the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) ratified Edwin Poots as its first elected leader in its 50-year history. And to say this democratic process has got off to a rough start doesn’t quite capture it. Since the party dipped its toe in these new waters: a DUP executive member has resigned; it’s rumoured that some councillors could follow; senior figures walked out of the Poots’ acceptance speech; and there’s even been an allegation of terrorist intimidation in the electoral process: Reports that the UDA used threats & intimidation to influence the DUP leadership contest, if true, are deeply disturbing. The @ChiefConPSNI needs to investigate these reports…

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“Harm Is Still Being Done”: 36 Years After MOVE Bombing, Misuse of Children’s Remains Reopens Wounds

This week marks the 36th anniversary of the day the city of Philadelphia bombed its own citizens. On May 13, 1985, police surrounded the home of MOVE, a radical Black liberation organization that was defying orders to vacate. Police flooded the home with water, filled the house with tear gas, and blasted the house with automatic weapons, all failing to dislodge the residents. Finally, police dropped a bomb on the house from a helicopter, killing 11 people, including five children. The fire burned an entire city block to the ground, destroying over 60 homes. But the tragedy didn’t end on that day. We look at how Princeton and…

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28 years since the murder of Stephen Lawrence, and we’re still fighting for racial justice

On 22 April, we commemorate the 28th anniversary of the racist murder of Stephen Lawrence. His untimely death led to the 1999 MacPherson report – a watershed moment for race relations in Britain. But 28 years on, we are still fighting against racist oppression in all areas of life. The murder of Stephen Lawrence According to the inquest, “five white youths” murdered 18-year-old Lawrence in 1993 in “a completely unprovoked racist attack” in Eltham, South-East London. Police arrested five suspects but didn’t convict them. Only two of his attackers – Gary Dobson and David Norris – were sentenced in 2012. The tragedy set Lawrence’s parents Doreen and Neville…

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40 years on from the Brixton riots, the Police Bill could spark a summer of urban unrest

On 10 April 1981, young Brixton residents rose up in response to police oppression, entrenched inequality, and marginalisation. The unrest soon spread to urban centres across the UK. The Scarman Report went some way to identifying the root causes of the rebellions. But successive governments have failed to deal with these issues, and have exacerbated them in many cases. 40 years of cuts and privatisation, an increasingly fascist state, and a devastating pandemic have resulted in a frustrated, volatile population with little to lose. If plans for the proposed Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill go ahead, we could see history repeat itself. The battle for Brixton In 1981, the New…

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MLK Opposed “Poverty, Racism & Militarism” in Speech One Year Before His Assassination 53 Years Ago

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now! I’m Amy Goodman, as we end the show with the words of Dr. Martin Luther King. He was assassinated April 4th, 1968, at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee — just 39 years old. While Dr. King is primarily celebrated as a civil rights leader, he championed the cause of the poor and organized the Poor People’s Campaign to address issues of economic justice. He was also a fierce critic of U.S. foreign policy and the Vietnam War. We’re going to play a part of his “Beyond Vietnam War” speech, that…

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Poverty takes up to 20 years of good health away from people in England and Wales

People living in the most deprived areas of England face a gap of almost two decades of life in good general health compared with those in the least deprived areas, new figures show. Office for National Statistics (ONS) data published on Monday shows healthy life expectancy at birth among men living in the most deprived areas was 52.3 years in 2017 to 2019, compared with 70.7 years among those living in the least deprived areas. This amounts to a difference of 18.4 years in “good” general health between these populations across their life course. Women in the most deprived areas could expect to live 51.4 years in “good”…

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